Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Commercial Courses v. Private Tutor

::**Spoiler Warning**::
A private tutor is about to tell you not to go to a commercial class!

A commercial course can be good, but usually not great.
Here is what I explain to my students: To truly master the LSAT you must practice techniques which are easy to apply but difficult to learn. These huge corporations are targeting the average student. If they tried teaching you the REAL way to approach the exam, their techniques would go right over the heads of half the class. Instead they sacrifice the top 20 or so points to pick up the below average 140 to the “sacred 160”.
Whenever I say this I always get looks of admonishment: “why would they do that!”.
I’ll tell you why.
On the average, a significant percentage of the highest scoring students don’t go to commercial classes because they study by themselves or with private tutors. Thus the average “commercial classroom” is made up of the lower percentage LSAT scorers. Think about it, those who don’t score well on their own sign up for classes.
If “Commercial Company” were to teach the best method in approaching the exam not only would half the class not understand what was being taught, they would be upset. Spending twelve hundred dollars on a course to not get anywhere is frustrating to say the least. These unsatisfied bottom 50% (of the class) will go around making disparaging remarks about the company, leaving only a mere 20-30% satisfied. And think about it, who’s louder? The angry child or the happy child? Exactly, not only are the 50% more in number they are louder in "volume." Remember, the first priority of any company is the bottom line and bad press has the potential to ruin "the bottom line."
Therefore, they teach techniques which enable a jump in points, but are too generalized to attain an amazing score. In other words, they sacrifice your top 20 points. This keeps everyone happy. The lower 50% now understand what is said in class and achieve a jump in points. The upper 30% aren’t even aware there is a better way to approach the test (an approach that would look like a pole vault in point gain as compared to their “jump”) to even get upset that they weren’t taught it.
This is why I’m here. With the proper instruction anyone can learn the skill set necessary to take the LSAT. As I am not a huge corporation pandering to thousands of students, I take the time to teach each and everyone the proper way to approach the exam. I teach you to score a 180, I give you the tools to get a “perfect” score.
All you need to do is practice.

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